Cantilever Pine Trim and Gothic Window Installed!

Here are a few photos of the Gothic window on the front gable end that I made last December. Also, some photos of the cantilevered sections of the house. Nice pine goes a long way to tidy up the look of a Tyvek covered house! Tyvek is nice, but it sure doesn’t look pretty after it’s been up for a while… We’re really looking forward to getting the finish siding up.

This updates our progress thus far, but more pictures to come! Also, when we move into the more finish side of the house, it’ll be more appealing to post pictures on the blog of our progress. Sorry for things not being so fancy like other Tiny House blogs, but hey, it’s our journey and I’m a little more interested in the doing of the work than the taking of pictures. It’ll be easier to take more pictures when it’s not -15 C outside all the time… The sub-freezing temperatures really make it difficult to work on the house, but layering up and taking frequent breaks to warm up are key to getting some work done!

Enjoy!

 

Reclaimed Sill from a house in Blockhouse, NS.

Reclaimed sill from a house in Blockhouse, NS.

The casement window I got for free in Hubbards, NS. Thankful for Kijiji!

The casement window I got for free in Hubbards, NS. Thankful for Kijiji!

Pine trim for the window, which had no trim at all, just the frame.

Pine trim for the window, which had no trim at all, just the frame.

Readying some trim.

Readying some trim.

Kitchen window and pine trim all done!

Kitchen window and pine trim all done!

Underside area where the front door will be. Lovely pine.

Underside area where the front door will be. Lovely pine.

Pine Trim and Homemade Gothic window! Stained Glass from Atlantic Stained Glass in Dartmouth, NS.

Pine Trim and Homemade Gothic window! Stained Glass from Atlantic Stained Glass in Dartmouth, NS.

 

Colin & Kristin

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The Roof Goes On! (Also a few pictures of preparing for the metal roof.)

Just before Christmas, my brother-in-law Nick installed the Metal Roof from Scotia Metal in Dartmouth, NS. Scotia Metal was great to work with and very helpful with my very little experience with metal roofing. I was a bit apprehensive about this phase of the build, as the roof is so important to install correctly. With the amount of driving rain we get here in Nova Scotia and snow, it is even more important to install a tight roof.

We decided on a roof color called “Coffee Brown.” It doesn’t stand out too much and blends in nicely with most environments. Also, with our plan of having green-stained wooden clapboard, it goes well with color scheme.

Here are some photos of the roof going on!

But first, a few photos of our preparing the roof structure for the metal roofing itself. This includes installing the steel v-groove windbracing that we used to brace and make rigid the rafters (instead of plywood, as plywood would add a lot of weight), installing 1/2″ foamboard for increased R-Value, and the synthetic underlayment to keep water from penetrating beneath the metal roof.

Steel Windbracing instead of heavy plywood.

Steel windbracing instead of heavy plywood.

Installing the Steel Windbracing.

Installing the steel windbracing.

Sam (my nephew) helping me install the 1/2" foamboard in place of plywood.

Sam (my nephew) helping me install the 1/2″ foamboard in place of plywood.

Roof Life.

Roof life.

Installing the 1x3 strapping for the metal roof.

Installing the 1×3 strapping for the metal roof.

Almost there...

Almost there…

Roof Guard synthetic underlayment.

Roof Guard synthetic underlayment.

Kristin installing the fascia board.

Kristin installing the fascia board. Lazy Saturday morning attire with Nick’s work boots. =)

 

Job done!

Job done!

Ready for metal!

Ready for metal!

Finishing the fascia.

Finishing the fascia from Hefler.

Robin flying away after dining on the cherry tree's fruit!

Robin flying away after dining on the cherry tree’s fruit!

Nick squaring up the first steel panel of roofing. Really important to start it nicely square.

Nick squaring up the first steel panel of roofing. Really important to start it nicely square.

Helper up top.

Helper up top.

DSC_0254

First side nearly done! It goes up quite fast once you get the initial few in place.

First side nearly done! It goes up quite fast once you get the initial few in place.

Ripping the last piece for that side. Very difficult to rip down the middle without cutting up your hands.

Ripping the last piece for that side. Very difficult to rip down the middle without cutting up your hands.

Gable End Trim.

Gable end trim.

My little nephew Gareth helping out. Couldn't quite reach...

My little nephew Gareth helping out. Couldn’t quite reach…

More trim.

More trim.

Front Gable End Trim.

Front Gable End Trim.

Discussing the end trim.

Discussing the end trim.

Again the roof is from Scotia Metal’s of Dartmouth, NS. (www.scotiametal.ca)

The Fascia Trim and Rafters (along with nearly all of the other wood used in this project is from my friends at Hefler Quailty Lumber in Lucasville, NS. They have been excellent to work with and provide really quality lumber. Their website is (www.hefler.ca).

Thanks all, and enjoy.

Colin & Kristin.

Photos of walls going up

Walls Go Up!

So, it’s been a while since I’ve last written. Too long, for sure. I am opting out of Facebook, and will be able to put a little more time into this blog to keep it well up to date. Here is a post with a lot of pictures of the walls going up. Later posts will have more detail in them, but for now, I just wanted to get the blog mostly up to date.

The walls are made from Hefler’s 2×4 utility lumber as well as stamped lumber. They are a really excellent supplier and I have nothing to say but good things about their service and helpfulness. I’m using 16″ centers for wall construction. Most everything is attached together using 3″ deck screws, but nails were used in some key areas, such as headers, sill plates, and top plates (areas where there is a lot of sheer tension–this is where nails are superior to screws!). I will say that screws are much easier to use when you’re working by yourself, and don’t send everything flying all over the place when you’re trying to hold the wood in place, hold the nail, hammer, etc. So, I’ve found screwing the structure together very helpful– especially if you’re learning as you go and need to re-adjust something if it’s not quite correct the first time!

Kristin has been a great help with planning and other important areas of design. I haven’t minded working mostly by myself on the different small portions, as it’s good learning for my woodworking interests. Nick, my brother-in-law has helped out in some very key areas thus far and has been a huge help to this house taking shape.

More in-depth posts to come, especially as I post pictures of the walls up, roof on and where we get to the finish siding and interior work. That is where the really interesting stuff begins!

Peace to you all,

Colin & Kristin

 

Walls built but not ready to yet be put upright!

Walls built but not ready to yet be put upright!

The trailer with two of the walls made thus far. Both end walls.

The trailer with two of the walls made thus far. Both end walls.

My lumber truc.... er, car. This is how we moved all of the wood to site from Hefler Quality Lumber in Lucasville, NS. Lots of good lumber!

My lumber truc…. er, car. This is how we moved all of the wood to site from Hefler Quality Lumber in Lucasville, NS. Lots of good lumber! I thought I may get pulled over with such a ridiculous load in the car, but no trouble at all!

Kristin screwing in a sill for our other kitchen window on the right wall.

Kristin screwing in a sill for our other kitchen window on the right wall.

Kitchen wall is the first up!

Kitchen wall is the first up!

The the tall, balloon framed rightmost wall. This will also carry the weight of our loft.

The tall balloon-framed rightmost wall. This will also carry the weight of our loft.

Corner Bracing/Wind Bracing. Great stuff to solidify the structure and make it even more rigid against wind, racking, traveling on the road, etc.

Corner Bracing/Wind Bracing. Great stuff to solidify the structure and make it even more rigid against wind, racking, traveling on the road, etc.

Kristin building the header to go above the wheel well. She did very well!

Kristin building the header to go above the wheel well. She did very well!

The walls are getting there! Half way.

The walls are getting there! Half way.

And tarped up...

And tarped up…

Sub Floor Construction.

Here are some photos of the construction of our sub-floor.

The 7,500 lb. utility trailer built by Randy Warman (Warman Welding in Rexton, NB) was done excellently. It is a beautiful trailer and his quality of workmanship is exceptional. I recommend him highly. The trailer is 8′ wide and 20′ long. We ordered it with no decking so that we could just simply build a 3 5/8″ sub floor right on top of it.

Note: We are using wood entirely from Hefler’s Quality Lumber Ltd. in Lucasville, NS. ( https://www.facebook.com/pages/Hefler-Quality-Lumber/332189983628209 )

They are an excellent company that provides the area with locally milled, sustainable lumber. They know their stuff very well. It’s not like walking into Home Depot or Kent, they actually really know what they’re talking about and are confident in their product.

I will use as many products of theirs as I can! Highly recommended!

 

Now for the pictures:

Figuring out the length of the sub floor.

Figuring out the length of the sub floor.

Checking the 3" framing wood with the 3" of rigid foam I'm using for the floor.

Checking the 3″ framing wood with the 3″ of rigid foam I’m using for the floor.

Floor layout. These joists have to be directly over the C channel that is on the trailer. This is important for the distribution of weight equally and evenly.

Floor layout. These joists have to be directly over the C channel that is on the trailer. This is important for the distribution of weight equally and evenly.

Nailing in Heavy Duty angle brackets.

Nailing in Heavy Duty angle brackets.

Kristin displaying the lovely floor!

Kristin displaying the lovely floor!

Pre-drilling for the 3/8" x 5" bolts that hold the sub floor to the trailer frame (there are 20 of these bolts holding the sub floor down).

Pre-drilling for the 3/8″ x 5″ bolts that hold the sub floor to the trailer frame (there are 20 of these bolts holding the sub floor down).

Drilling.

Drilling.

Middle section of the floor.

Middle section of the floor.

Applying the aluminium flashing to the base of the floor for protection and as a vapor/pest/debris barrier.

Applying the aluminium flashing to the base of the floor for protection and as a vapor/pest/debris barrier.

Nick and I taping all seams.

Nick and I taping all seams.

Rigid foam is in! Mostly done at night, so not very many pictures of this process. R-15 insulation value.

Rigid foam is in! Mostly done at night, so not very many pictures of this process. R-15 insulation value.

Kristin taping seams.

Kristin taping seams.

Figuring the installation of the 5/8" T&G plywood floor.

Figuring the installation of the 5/8″ T&G plywood floor.

Entirely using wood from Hefler's Forest Products in Lucasville, NS.  Excellent wood and quality of service from them! Highly recommended.

Entirely using wood from Hefler’s Forest Products in Lucasville, NS.
Excellent wood and quality of service from them! Highly recommended.

 

More photos of the wall construction to come!

A beginning to our tiny house journey in Nova Scotia.

Hello all,

We begin here at the almost beginning of our journey of recent. My wife Kristin and I decided to look into a tiny house as a viable option in April of 2014. We had heard of them before and seen many pictures, but for a while had decided that they were too radical, too small and just not practical for our needs. We revisited them again this spring and as we had been looking to rent in various places around Halifax, NS, we realized that rent is quite expensive and the apartments aren’t all that excellent.

We have been looking to move from home in Middle Sackville into a place of our own, to develop our own rhythms and culture as a new-ish couple (married 3 years). We have been living with my wife’s mother in her basement for two years and decided that it was time to make a move out now that my immigration from the US was taken care of and my second year of Heritage Carpentry at NSCC in Lunenburg, NS was soon to begin.

We decided on a tiny house as the best choice for our situation and journey for a few reasons. Many blogs are out there and the builders/writers of those blogs all have their legitimate reasons. Our reasons for building a tiny house were:

1) To try to write a better story. We don’t have children yet, and work is flexible and what I’m studying in school pertains very closely with what this house will entail. For many people, a tiny house isn’t viable nor the best option. For us, it seemed to make sense and also is something we hope to be a good story one day. We want to live as much as possible in a way that creates a beautiful story, as we all ourselves live within a great Story.

2) To reduce costs and re-imagine what living costs have to be. This sounds cooler than it really is, I suppose. We are on a pretty tight budget and really want to re-think our society’s financial philosophy and see if not being a slave to our professions is a viable thing in our day. We think it is. (Example: Can Kristin be a stay-at-home mother and I work four days a week [or so] in my profession? Can spending more time together as a family happen?)

3) To have a portable home! This allows us to move our house depending on Church community, family and work in our current time of not being completely settled in one area. We have a region where we’d like to be, but this allows us to have a solid, relatively inexpensive place to be in, wherever we are in location.

Note: We’re not really interested in moving at any whim, or traveling a lot with our house, but it does afford some flexibility in our time of not being completely rooted in one area.

4) To gain experience in building a home and to do this together and also with family and friends. This is an excellent way to learn to work with your hands and it’s more straightforward than you’d think!

 

Enjoy the photos of our sub-floor construction to come!

 

 

Kristin and I.

Kristin and I.